(Source: llemonliz)

misshorrorshow-of-midgard:

Ladies, gents and non-binaries: Stephen Fry, man who possesses the most common sense of any human on earth.

(Source: zombieoscarwetnwilde)

"He’s sort of an average guy, and we wanted his style to reflect somebody that’s comfortable and not uptight, but also a little disassembled and just going through the world. 

I don’t know exactly how we arrived at the high-waisted pants, but I think when Spike [Jonze] wrote the character, he had Theodore Roosevelt in mind. Joaquin’s pants throughout the film have a really tapered leg, based on late 1800s pants for riding horses … It looked interesting and weird, but it felt comfortable and casual and a little sloppy.”

- Casey Storm, costume designer for Her (2013)

(Source: fashion-and-film)

designmeetstyle:

Color of the Week: Spiced Butternut

Yellow continues to be a dramatic, daring and bright color popular as accents in jewelry, fashion and home decor. It’s a color that is powerful yet sophisticated and sunny. Bold, bright and luscious, consider Behr’s Spiced Butternut for any space inside your home. Yellow’s versatility abounds and the gallery of rooms above just affirms our love of this youthful yellow.

[X]

(Source: matchingvnecks)

the-time-lord-of-the-rings:

Mama Fury on waking up the Avengers.

(Source: Askthederpvengers)

part-of-your-worldd:

xgenepositive:

mmmahogany:

#john barrowman is having none of your misogynist bullshit

i love that barrowman’s response also distances him from the contestant
"hahahaha women do laundry right john?  you with me, john?"
"don’t lump me in with you, you fucking martian”

his face in the last one lmao

(Source: kaniehtiio)

twistedviper:

missmeaganlouise:

You know all those wonderful Conservative parents who proceed to abandon, kick out, or cut off their children for any reason (including, but not limited to a child’s sexuality)?
Well here we go:

“But if anyone does not provide for his own, and especially for those of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.”
1 Timothy 5:8 (NKJV)

image


#I will never not reblog this #because I love the way Tony just comes right out and says it #like it’s no big deal #like when others meet bruce its kinda the elephant in the room #but tony couldn’t care less
vegandragon:

We used to be best buddies,
But now we’re not.
I wish you would tell me why…

vegandragon:

We used to be best buddies,

But now we’re not.

I wish you would tell me why…

fdelopera:

rjdaae:

kellizredd:

ninjagiry:


There’re plenty musicals, where race doesn’t matter, but I’m totally against color-blind casting in POTO, Les Mis and other shows where it harms the historical authenticity.

Wow. Really on point there. I mean, it’s not as if France has been interacting with the African continent since the 8th century, ESPECIALLY not to the point where French is listed as an official language for several large countries. And as we know, there was absolutely NO cultural mingling between Africa and France, especially none where Africans were integrated into French society. And CERTAINLY not to the point of being of high historical, social, and political status. 
Hell, it’s not like there were any black artists of any kind in the 19th century.  The idea of black people being artists just hadn’t even been invented yet! And as we all know, there were absolutely no POC in the original Phantom of the Opera novel by Gaston Leroux, most definitely none that played major roles and altered the course of the plot. 
Good on you, OP. Truly you stand to uphold the gold standard of historical accuracy!


I think the point is that there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France. Good day.

Well of course there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France.
How silly.
He’d be French African, obviously.

Sigh. The only thing worse than a troll is a racist, ignorant troll.
Let’s talk about Le Fantôme de l’Opéra, the novel that ALW’s musical was based on, for a moment, shall we?
In Leroux’s novel, the Persian was obviously a person of color, that much is undeniable. So there goes the OP’s argument that there should be no people of color in Phantom. Despite the fact that the Persian was whitewashed in the musical and turned into a Caucasian Mme Giry (it is not clear whether she is Caucasian in the novel — see below), this does not erase the fact that Leroux didn’t intend for this character to be white.
So OP, stop making racist comments about the Phantom being played by a black actor, and start making legitimate complaints about how ALW’s musical does not represent the people of color in Leroux’s novel.
Next, Erik’s skin color in the novel and in the musical is not white or black — it is yellow (“Like yellow parchment is his skin…” etc.). So by the OP’s logic, only people with jaundice can play the role. Smh.
Finally, based on Gaston Leroux’s description, Meg Giry was a person of color — that is to say, she probably had African or Middle Eastern heritage (we don’t get a clear enough description of Mme Giry’s complexion to know whether this came from her side of the family, from her husband Jules’ side, or both).
Leroux writes: “la petite Giry, – des yeux pruneaux, des cheveux d’encre, un teint de bistre”
This means: “Little Giry — with prune-dark eyes, hair like ink, a brown complexion”
And yet, despite this clear description, this is how Meg Giry is portrayed in ALW’s musical:

Whitewashed much? If one wants to make the argument that the characters in the musical should be like their book counterparts, why isn’t Meg black?
So my advice to you, OP, is educate yourself before you go making racist and ignorant comments about topics that you clearly do not understand. Or if you do want to spout off like that, go talk to your friends offline and stop clogging up the Phandom with your hate.

fdelopera:

rjdaae:

kellizredd:

ninjagiry:

There’re plenty musicals, where race doesn’t matter, but I’m totally against color-blind casting in POTO, Les Mis and other shows where it harms the historical authenticity.

Wow. Really on point there. I mean, it’s not as if France has been interacting with the African continent since the 8th century, ESPECIALLY not to the point where French is listed as an official language for several large countries. And as we know, there was absolutely NO cultural mingling between Africa and France, especially none where Africans were integrated into French society. And CERTAINLY not to the point of being of high historical, social, and political status. 

Hell, it’s not like there were any black artists of any kind in the 19th century.  The idea of black people being artists just hadn’t even been invented yet! And as we all know, there were absolutely no POC in the original Phantom of the Opera novel by Gaston Leroux, most definitely none that played major roles and altered the course of the plot. 

Good on you, OP. Truly you stand to uphold the gold standard of historical accuracy!

I think the point is that there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France. Good day.

Well of course there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France.

How silly.

He’d be French African, obviously.

Sigh. The only thing worse than a troll is a racist, ignorant troll.

Let’s talk about Le Fantôme de l’Opéra, the novel that ALW’s musical was based on, for a moment, shall we?

In Leroux’s novel, the Persian was obviously a person of color, that much is undeniable. So there goes the OP’s argument that there should be no people of color in Phantom. Despite the fact that the Persian was whitewashed in the musical and turned into a Caucasian Mme Giry (it is not clear whether she is Caucasian in the novel — see below), this does not erase the fact that Leroux didn’t intend for this character to be white.

So OP, stop making racist comments about the Phantom being played by a black actor, and start making legitimate complaints about how ALW’s musical does not represent the people of color in Leroux’s novel.

Next, Erik’s skin color in the novel and in the musical is not white or black — it is yellow (“Like yellow parchment is his skin…” etc.). So by the OP’s logic, only people with jaundice can play the role. Smh.

Finally, based on Gaston Leroux’s description, Meg Giry was a person of color — that is to say, she probably had African or Middle Eastern heritage (we don’t get a clear enough description of Mme Giry’s complexion to know whether this came from her side of the family, from her husband Jules’ side, or both).

Leroux writes: “la petite Giry, – des yeux pruneaux, des cheveux d’encre, un teint de bistre”

This means: “Little Giry — with prune-dark eyes, hair like ink, a brown complexion”

And yet, despite this clear description, this is how Meg Giry is portrayed in ALW’s musical:

Whitewashed much? If one wants to make the argument that the characters in the musical should be like their book counterparts, why isn’t Meg black?

So my advice to you, OP, is educate yourself before you go making racist and ignorant comments about topics that you clearly do not understand. Or if you do want to spout off like that, go talk to your friends offline and stop clogging up the Phandom with your hate.

(Source: potoconfessions)

slayboybunny:

dont ask me for relationship advice because i will always just tell you to break up w/ them and throw their shit in a dumpster because i do not understand the concept of allowing anyone to treat you poorly this is a zero tolerance zone 

(Source: raduyev)

(Source: aquamans)